Pride @ Prejudice | June 23 – August 17

by Daniel Elihu Kramer
directed by Janis Stevens

sponsored byand 

Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy fall in love all over again—in this romantic deconstruction of Austen’s beloved novel. Playfully reinvented with modern-day characters literally stepping off the page to blog, google, and tweet, this homage to one of the world’s most popular love stories, is delivered with humor, wit, and just a little sass.

Schedule
Saturday, June 23, 7:30 p.m. (Opening with Pre-Show Classics in Context Discussion)
Saturday, July 7, 7:30 p.m. (Post-Show Discussion)
Wednesday, July 11, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 22, 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, July 28, 1:00 p.m.
Thursday, August 2, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, August 9, 1:00 p.m.
Wednesday, August 15, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, August 17, 7:30 p.m.
Coming Soon!

From the Director

I know!  I know! Yet another iteration? Haven’t we already wrung every drop of Regency Romance and perceptive irony out of Elizabeth and Darcy’s saga? That’s certainly what I was thinking when I started reading Mr. Kramer’s script but what I found, instead, was a delightfully rich exploration of Austen’s beloved work. The playwright accesses her novel and her letters as well as the wide range of pertinent public domain materials available on the internet—blogs, chat rooms, and discussion boards—adding an unexpected level of exuberance to the narrative.

This stage version is truly celebratory not only with respect to the source material but as a champion of literary detective work! The immediacy of our modern critical resources offers multiple avenues of exploration to be enjoyed “in the moment” leading us to imagine a kind of “library” setting that simultaneously lends itself to the late 19th-Century era while also housing the devices and paraphernalia of our modern digital age.

The rapidity of wit that drives Austen’s humor and her reveal of the truth that underlies the “manners of the day” is echoed in the instantaneous explorations and discoveries made by the “internet characters” in Mr. Kramer’s thoughtful celebration of Pride and Prejudice.